Can You Tell Us If These Techniques Are Knitting or Crocheting?

LIFESTYLE

Teresa McGlothlin

6 Min Quiz

Image: kate_sept2004/E+/Getty Images

About This Quiz

Unless you've been living under a rock, you're well aware that knitting and crocheting are just as popular now as they were in your great-grandmother's day. No matter which art form you prefer, the fact that you're here proves that you know how to spin yarn into a clever homemade gift. But do you know as many of these techniques as you think you do? 

In case inspiration strikes during this quiz, grab a skein or two while you answer our questions. We'll present you with a technique, and then we'll ask you to place it in the knitting or the crochet category. After 35 questions, you will be able to impress your crafty circle of friends with your knowledge of both textile forms. 

Do you know your basketweave stitch from your popcorn stitch? How about your dpns from your ehdc? This quiz is designed to put your creative knowledge to the ultimate test. Will you get as many of these techniques right as you think you will? Or will you need to spend a little more time at YouTube University? 

Knitting or crocheting? Which one will it be? Let's find out how well you know knitting and crocheting techniques!

If you're reading a pattern and you see the garter stitch, what sort of pattern are you reading?

Usually, those who are just learning to knit will learn the garter stitch first. The garter stitch resembles an S-pattern, and it creates a durable textile. Experts recommend starting with this easy technique.

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Would you need to front post while knitting a scarf or crocheting a blanket?

When noted on a crochet pattern, the front post stitch is indicated by FP. Using this stitching technique will create a raised edge along a row of stitches. The front post stitch adds a nice texture when repeated throughout a creation.

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Knitting or crocheting? Which one involves the linen stitch?

Even with the tightest of single crochet stitches, you could never achieve the appearance of knitting's linen stitch. Knitters love the linen stitch because of its appearance and its simplicity.

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Does "BLO" belong on a knitting or crocheting abbreviation chart?

Instead of going through both loops of a stitch, BLO tells crocheters to only go through the back loop. Using this technique creates a ridged type of texture that adds character and allows the fabric to stretch.

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You're working and you see "St st" on your pattern. What are you doing?

The stockinette stitch is a knitting stitch annotated with the abbreviation "St st." It's sometimes called the stocking stitch because it creates the kind of tight weaving needed to make socks.

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If you see "dpn" on a pattern, are you using knitting needles or a crochet hook?

"Dpn" is short for "double-pointed needles." This knitting technique is used to create things that are made in the round like hats or cozies. Three needles are needed to pull off the technique successfully.

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Would you find a POP stitch on a knitted or crocheted coffee cozy?

Sometimes, the popcorn stitch is abbreviated as "PC" too. The stitch is known for its puffy and rounded appearance. If you wanted to recreate it, you would insert five single crochet stitches into the same foundation stitch.

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Are you crocheting or knitting when you complete the sc2tog stitch?

When you are crocheting and see "sc2tog," it means you need to single crochet two stitches together. This crocheting technique is used when you need to decrease a row's length while following a pattern.

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Is a triple treble something you would do in knitting or crocheting?

Abbreviated as "TrTr" on a crochet pattern, the triple treble stitch is used to create large columns that have a little height. To complete it, you pile up three loops before you insert the hook into the base stitch.

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Knitting or crocheting? Which art would you be practicing when you EDC?

EDC, or extended double crochet, is a technique that adds height and texture to any crochet piece. In total, you go through two loops while pulling up three additional loops. Then you complete the double crochet stitch like usual.

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Are you knitting or crocheting when you make a couch throw with the bamboo stitch?

Beginners and expert knitters love the bamboo stitch. The double-rowed stitch consists of only two rows as the base. When completed, the bamboo stitch leaves a piece textured with an X pattern.

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Does the basketweave stitch belong in the crocheting or knitting family?

The basketweave stitch might look a little intimidating to those who have just picked up a pair of needles. It's really easy, though. Once you have it down, you'll be able to create all sorts of scarves with an elegant weaved finish.

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If you were using the Chinese wave stitch, would you be crocheting or knitting?

The Chinese wave stitch is perfect for knitted projects that require a thicker fabric. It's completed with the use of the garter stitch so it eliminates the need for purling.

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Do you start projects with a chain stitch when knitting or crocheting?

When you're beginning to crochet, the chain stitch is the first thing you do. The chain stitch is a series of single stitches that form the foundation of any crochet project, and they determine the length or the width of a piece.

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You can make a nice sweater with the tile stitch. Would you be knitting or crocheting it?

Do not let the pattern created by the tile stitch fool you! It's a lot easier than it seems. In fact, the pattern is created by combining two basic knitting techniques — the garter and the stockinette.

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If a pattern indicates a "PS", are you knitting or crocheting?

If a pattern is asking you to "PS" or "PUFF," you're going to make a puff stitch. Many chunky hats are made with this stitch, and it's easy to do. Half finish stitches and crochet as usual until your little puff has reached its desired appearance.

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If you're using the purl ridge stitch, are you knitting or crocheting?

The "purl bumps" created by the purl ridge stitch are a versatile knitting technique to learn. They're created by combining the stockinette stitch with a crossover technique that alternates between the left and right hand.

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The DTR stitch would be found in which form of textile work?

Making something like a blanket or a sweater might call for the DTR stitch. When makers see DTR, they know to double a triple crochet into the same foundation stitch. It also helps to increase a row's length.

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Would you be crocheting or knitting a scowl using the diamond honeycomb stitch?

The diamond honeycomb stitch adds a touch of class to any knitting project. The raised diamond pattern might look difficult, but most patterns that use the stitch are rated for beginners.

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"SP" indicates space, but is it a knitting or a crocheting technique?

Knitting has another word for creating a space in a row, but "SP" is used to instruct it when crocheting. As you are crocheting along, you skip a few foundation stitches to create a pattern of holes.

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Would a knitting or crocheting tutorial give you instructions with the abbreviation "rnd"?

The "rnd," or "round," abbreviation is used when making something in a circular pattern. Rnd is usually followed with a number that indicates the pattern's position in the completion of the product. Rnd1 would be closer to the center than rnd14.

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Will you need to wrap and turn when you're knitting or crocheting?

When you're knitting and you see "w&t," it's time to wrap and turn. Wrapping and turning are necessary at the end of any row, but they can be used to create an interesting pattern.

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Which activity uses the raspberry stitch to create a unique pattern?

The raspberry stitch is one of the most loved stitches in knitting. Also known as a blackberry stitch or a trinity stitch, the raspberry stitch adds texture and pattern to any scarf or blanket!

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Is the cluster stitch a common technique found in knitting or crocheting?

The cluster stitch (CL) is a stitch that's large and similar to the shell stitch. Many crocheters like to complete the cluster stitch alongside the shell stitch to create interesting patterns, but it can be done alone.

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Would you use a seed stitch while crocheting or knitting a pair of mittens?

Avid knitters love using the seed stitch. The seed stitch is similar to the basic knit stitch, but it creates a small waffled pattern. It's known as one of the basic knit and purl stitches.

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Does "bpdc" belong on a pattern for a pair of crocheted socks or knitted?

While you might find bpdc (back post double crochet) on a crochet pattern, it's not the ideal stitch for socks. Bpds creates tall stitches and a nice pattern, but it leaves too many gaps for toes to poke through.

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The rib stitch is often used to create winter hats. Is it a crocheting or a knitting technique?

You can create the same look with crochet, but the rib stitch is a knitting technique. It creates a durable but stretchy material that is perfect for beanies, toboggans or earflap hats.

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Would you "YOH" while crocheting or while knitting?

"YOH" is the crochet abbreviation that means "yarn over hook." In this technique, you pick up the next stitch with your yarn over your hook rather than under it like usual.

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One of today's trendiest techniques is called the netted stitch. Is it a crochet or knitting technique?

Knitters everywhere are clamoring about the netted stitch again. It's a little more advanced than knit and purl stitches, but it's worth the effort. It's perfect for adding a nautical touch to projects like beach bags.

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Do you bobble while knitting or crocheting?

Adding the bobble stitch to your next crochet project will add a touch of fun. Similar to the shell stitch and the cluster stitch, the bobble stitch creates a rounded, raised textile pattern.

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Would you find the herringbone lace rib stitch on a knitting or crocheting technique chart?

The herringbone lace rib stitch is a technique that advanced knitters love. When a lighter-weight yarn is used, the finished product takes on the appearance of fine lace.

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If your pattern calls for a "ch-", are you following a knitting pattern or a crochet pattern?

"Ch-" is a stitch that's unique to crochet. It refers to working into stitches backward. In other words, ch- means that you go backward for one stitch on the row you are working.

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"Tch" means "turn chain" in knitting or crocheting?

Working the last stitches into a crocheted row can be a little tricky. A lot of patterns use a technique calling "turning chain" ("tch"). It means exactly what it sounds like. At the end of the row, you turn your work so that you can continue.

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Would you "pwise" while knitting or crocheting a pair of leg warmers?

Purl is one of the first knitting techniques you would learn as a beginner. In more complex patterns, you might see purlwise (pwise) mentioned. It means to slip into the next stitch and to cross your left needle over your right.

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If you see the abbreviation "SC" on your pattern, are you knitting or crocheting?

In the art of crochet, "SC" is short for "single crochet." The single crochet stitch is the first stitch you have to learn. It's considered the most durable of all crochet stitches because it binds yarn so closely together.

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