Can You Name These 1960s TV Families?

By: Gavin Thagard
Image: ABC via youtube

About This Quiz

From a family of hillbillies moving to Hollywood in "The Beverly Hillbillies" to a father raising his three sons after the death of their mother in "My Three Sons," the 1960s was full of some of the most fun and identifiable families in the history of television. How well do you know the families that came to dominate television in the '60s? Can you match each of them to a screenshot? Here's your chance to find out!

If you grew up watching television shows in the 1960s or you go back and watch reruns now, you might appreciate the variety of options and the more in-depth storylines, as compared to the '50s. What you may also recognize is the variety of family units that were depicted on television in the '60s. Not all families were traditional - television started to break barriers, incorporating more taboo subject matter into the family dynamic. Television still had a long way to go by the end of the decade, but it was a great start for television families. 

If you're ready to reflect back on some of the most entertaining families from the 1960s, get started with this quiz and put your television trivia knowledge on display! 

In "The Brady Bunch," the Brady kids didn't have a toilet in their bathroom. This is because toilets weren't allowed to be shown on television at the time.

"The Andy Griffith Show" won a host of awards during its run on television. Don Knotts, particularly, was recognized several times for his role as Barney Fife.

"Father Knows Best" started as a radio show in 1949. It aired for six seasons on the radio before it was turned into a television show.

The Addams family was one of the first television families to have a computer in their house. It was named Whizzo. Of course, it wasn't a small desktop computer, considering those were years away from development.

Ozzie and Harriet Nelson played in an orchestra together in the early '30s. The duo started a radio program together during the '40s, then their television show came out in 1952.

Elizabeth Montgomery starred as Samantha Stephens in "Bewitched." Though she gained the most fame for her role as Samantha, Montgomery later had success with films like "A Case of Rape" and "The Legend of Lizzie Borden."

Critics tore "The Beverly Hillbillies" apart early during the show's run. However, that didn't stop it from topping the ratings year in and year out as fans fell in love with the Clampetts.

The Munsters were made up of a series of monster characters from classic movies. Universal Studios luckily had the rights to these characters and didn't have to pay any royalties.

Dan Blocker, who played Hoss Cartwright, died in between two of the later seasons in "Bonanza." The show decided not to replace him, and instead, his death was addressed directly by the writers.

Thurston and Lovey Howell were two castaways on the show "Gilligan's Island." Originally, Gilligan's first name was intended to be Willy. However, the name is never actually used in the show - he just goes by Gilligan.

Flipper wasn't actually voiced by a dolphin. Instead, the creators of the show used the altered sound of a kookaburra bird.

"The Danny Thomas Show," originally called "Make Room for Daddy," had a run from 1953 until 1957 on ABC. The show was picked up in 1957 by CBS, where it aired until 1964.

Lassie was portrayed as a female dog in the show. However, male dogs were actually used, because they are bigger and don't shed quite as much.

Don Fedderson created "Family Affair." He was also the creator of "My Three Sons" and "To Rome with Love."

The idea for "Lost in Space" has ties to the 1812 novel "The Swiss Family Robinson." The book was written by Johann David Wyss.

"Blondie" started off as a comic book strip, created by Chic Young. After his death in 1973, Young's son took over the strip.

"Pete and Gladys" was a spin-off series from "December Bride." The show featured several stars from "December Bride," including Verna Felton and Frances Rafferty.

Dennis was based on the son of Hank Ketcham, who created the original comic book strip. Ketcham also mirrored the parents after himself and his first wife, Alice. Sadly, Ketcham and his son were later estranged.

Airing on ABC, "The Courtship of Eddie's Father" was quite popular during its three-season​ run. However, creative differences forced the star, Bill Bixby, to leave the show.

"Green Acres" was based on the childhood experiences of creator Jay Sommers. As a child, Sommers was dragged to a farm by his step-father after he purchased the farm he always wanted.

Jerry Mathers played Theodore "The Beaver" Cleaver throughout the show. Prior to joining the show, Mathers once played "Dream Little Ricky" in "I Love Lucy."

Kate Bradley, who runs the Shady Rest Hotel in "Petticoat Junction," was played by Bea Benaderet. Benaderet, who was known for her unique voice, also voiced Betty Rubble in "The Flintstones."

Lucy was played by the famed actress Lucille Ball. Aside from her acting roles, Ball ran Desilu Productions, becoming the first woman to run a major television studio.

"That Girl" ran for five seasons on ABC from 1966 until 1971. The show starred Marlo Thomas and Ted Bessell, whose on-screen relationship developed throughout the series.

One of the most famous elements of "The Jetsons" was the moving walkways. Strangely, the first real-life moving walkway at an airport was built in 1958, a few years before the show was released. But way back in 1893, one was installed at the Chicago World's Fair.

Originally, "The Farmer's Daughter" was filmed in black and white. However, in 1965, the show switched over to Pathecolor, which was used for the remainder of the run.

Dick Van Dyke almost lost the role on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" to Johnny Carson. Luckily for Van Dyke, he had just come off of a successful Broadway run in "Bye, Bye Birdie." Of course, if Carson had been cast, the title would have been different.

"Hazel" was an American sitcom that ran for five seasons from 1961 until 1966. The show initially aired on NBC, but the final season aired on CBS, with a different branch of the Baxter family.

Airing for four seasons, "Laramie" was produced by Revue Studios. Revue was also known for shows like "Leave It to Beaver" and "Wagon Train."

"Tammy" was the theme song that played at the beginning of every episode. The song was written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. It received an Academy Award nomination in 1957, for the version used in the film "Tammy and the Bachelor."

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