Can You Name the Farm Equipment From an Image?

EMPLOYMENT

Bambi Turner

7 Min Quiz

Image: Nick Brundle Photography / Moment / Getty Images

About This Quiz

Do you know the difference between a cultivator and a tedder? Know when to use a hoe versus a shovel, or what that scary thing with the metal teeth is that hooks to the back of the tractor? Any idea why anyone would want to own a manure spreader? If you can answer these questions, you might have what it takes to ace this farm equipment quiz!

It's easy to see what draws people to pursue a career in agriculture: plenty of fresh air, the satisfaction of working the earth with your own hands, time spent with animals and not a cubicle in sight. Yet those dreaming of drafting a resignation letter and strapping on a pair of overalls should also take time to consider the other side of the equation heavy workloads, early mornings and the knowledge that weather, pests or bad luck can wipe out an entire season's crop. 

The good news is that modern farmers have plenty of equipment at their fingertips to make the job go more smoothly. Sure, you still have to till the land, but tractors and combines get the job done way faster than the team of horses your ancestors would have used. And yes, cows still need to be milked multiple times a day, but machinery and technology mean you can do the job in a fraction of the time that it would have taken a farmer in the 1800s.

Think you're ready for a life on the farm? Take our quiz to prove your farm equipment IQ!

Thanks to all the attachments and accessories on the market, this machine just might be the most versatile tool in a farmer's arsenal. Do you know what it's called?

A tractor really is the jack-of-all-trades on the farm. This ride-on machine ranges from compact to mega-sized and uses a variety of attachments and implements to till, plant and harvest all kinds of crops. This machine is so vital to farm operation that it's hard to believe gas-powered tractors have only been around since the 1890s.

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Anyone who's ever tried to dig a hole know that the earth can be pretty tough to penetrate. Can you name this tool that farmers use to prep the soil for planting?

Cultivators are designed to refine soil after it has already been tilled. They are typically dragged behind a tractor and use either rotary disks or a series of metal teeth to work the soil. The cultivator breaks up clumps and is helpful at aerating and removing weeds.

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Sure, you could plant each seed by hand, carefully covering it with dirt when you're done, or you could invest in one of these machines to do the job for you.

A seed drill precisely places seeds into the soil at specific depth and spacing. After placing each seed, the machine gently covers it with dirt so it won't blow away or end up as bird seed.

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Do you know the name of this equipment designed to make quick work of freshly cut hay?

Can you imagine how tough it would be to wrangled loose piles of hay? A baler is a machine that compresses the cut hay into square or round units called bales, which can then be wrapped in plastic or twine for easy handling and storage.

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Can you name this classic farming implement used for preparing soil for planting?

A plow is used for preliminary tilling and earth preparation before cultivation and planting. This machine, which is towed by a tractor, uses disks or spikes to turn and break up tough soil, loosening it up for further preparation with other devices.

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Can you ID this equipment used to apply weed killer?

Sprayers are used to apply liquids like pesticides or herbicides to crops. They range from simple backpack models to units that can be towed by a plow or ATV to treat a large area all at once.

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This equipment can transport everything from manure to animal feed. Do you know what it's called?

Wheelbarrows are a must-have for any size farm. Perfect for carting around loose items like dirt, manure, wood chips or gravel, they can also be used to transport a heavy bag of feed or fertilizer.

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Got livestock? Then you'll need one of these devices that allow you to protect yourself while caring for your critters.

Examining a sick cow or trying to give medicine to a sheep can be pretty tricky, even for experienced farmers. Headgates are designed to safely hold livestock in one place so you can adequately care for them without worrying about injury to yourself or the animal.

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Do you know the name of this common hand tool, which can be used on farms as well as in your own backyard?

A shovel is a must-have for farmers. It allows you to do everything from shoveling snow to digging a hole for a new fence post. Use rounded shovels for digging or choose a square shovel for scooping tasks, like spreading mulch.

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After a long day in the fields, the trip back to the house can seem to take forever. What's this machine that can help ease the stress on your aching legs?

Even small farms can include a lot of acres. Try to walk everywhere, and you won't have energy left to tend crops or care for animals! An ATV can make travel easier and help you reach an emergency in the far fields more quickly.

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Face it — farmers spend a whole lot of time dealing with dirt. Name this machine that can help make digging a breeze.

Farmers spend a lot of time digging and preparing new acres for planting. A backhoe uses an articulated arm to draw a heavy metal bucket toward a cab to dig through tough dirt. This machine can be used for everything from trenching to building a foundation to removing a large boulder from a potential planting area.

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So you've finally finished cutting all that hay, which is now laying in piles stretching out across the fields. Know the name of the equipment that can help get all that hay organized with ease?

A tedder is a tractor attachment used to help dry hay more quickly. It lifts and spreads the cut hay to reduce moisture, resulting in better-quality feed than if the hay were left to dry unassisted.

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Cows and other livestock produce an unbelievable amount of waste. Luckily, this excrement is surprisingly valuable to farmers. Can you name this tool used when working with animal waste?

A manure spreader is a piece of equipment designed to be pulled behind a tractor. It spreads a thin layer of manure across the soil for fertilization. And trust us — this is a way better way than spreading manure with your hands.

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Farmers have relied on various versions of this tool since nomadic tribes first became to settle in one spot. Think you know what it's called?

Farmers have been using hoes to tend the fields for hundreds of years. The hoe consists of a long handle with a thin metal blade at one end and is used to remove weeds and break up soil for planting over a small area.

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Got cows? Unless you've got hours to spare each day, you might want to invest in one of these handy machines.

Lactating cows need to be milked twice a day. What once took hours to do by hand can now be accomplished in a fraction of the time using a milking machine. The most common type is a cluster milker, which comes with four cups — one for each teat on the cow.

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Plowing can leave soil full of unwanted air pockets clumps of earth that make planting a challenge. What is the name of this equipment used when plowing is complete?

Despite its similar name, a cultipacker is different from a cultivator. The cultipacker consists of a heavy roller with cleats or spikes on the surface. When pulled behind a tractor, it crushes dirt clumps, flattens out air pockets and presses lightweight seeds into the soil where birds can't get them.

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Placing seeds one at a time can be a real hassle, but can you ID this equipment that can get the job done in a fraction of the time?

When precision seed placement isn't required, a broadcast seeder is the perfect piece of equipment for spreading seeds rapidly over an area. This device ranges from handheld to units so large they must be towed by a tractor and is designed to fling seeds from a hopper onto the ground quickly.

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Generations of farmers have used this tool to harvest crops. Think you know its name?

Farmers have long used sickles — long blades attached to wooden handles — to quickly chop wheat and other grains. A scythe is a similar tool which is much longer and designed for use with two hands, rather than the one hand required to swing a sickle.

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Got rocks? What is this tool that can help clear them from your fields?

The mattock, a pick-ax-like tool used in farming, consists of a heavy steel blade attached to a short handle. One end is blade shaped while the other is pointed, making this tool idea for everything from chopping up wood to picking rocks out of tough soil.

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Farmers often find they have to move seedlings once they've begun to sprout. You could do it by hand with a trowel or use this handy agricultural equipment to tackle the job in half the time.

Once seedlings have started to sprout, it often makes sense to transplant them to new parcels of land where they have more space to spread their roots. A transplanter is designed to make quick work of removing these plants from the earth and eliminates painful crouching or kneeling in the dirt.

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Grass can grow between 2 and 5 inches a week. Smart farmers invest in this piece of equipment to keep grass and weeds from taking over.

If you thought mowing your backyard was bad, imagine the upkeep when you own hundreds or thousands of acres! A good mower, whether it's a ride-on or a larger tractor attachment, is a worthwhile investment for any farmer.

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This equipment is used to process America's most commonly grown crop. Do you know what it's called?

This equipment might look intimidating, but it's critical to the work of corn farmers. This attachment, known as a corn head, uses giant fingers to fit between rows of corn and pluck each ear from its stalk.

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If you've never worked on a farm, you may have only seen this equipment in horror movies, but farmers know that this device is crucial for clearing new plots of land.

Farmers are forever maintaining fields and clearing new land for planting. A chainsaw makes quick work of unwanted trees and is also useful for things like cutting lumber or performing minor demo and site work.

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This equipment is used everywhere from warehouses to construction sites — including farms. Can you guess what it's called?

Many barns have lofts which are ideal for storing bales of hay or pallets of goods — but how to get stuff up to that second story. A forklift is a simple machine that makes it easy to lift heavy loads without breaking your back — or trying to climb a ladder with a giant bale of hay under one arm!

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So you've planted seeds and watch crops grow to maturity, but do you know the name of the equipment that can help you make it through the harvest with ease?

A draper head tractor attachment is an alternative to the traditional auger harvester. Instead of using spinning augers to cuts and collect grains, it relies on a conveyor belt to catch crops after they have been cut. This allows for faster harvest and less time spent in the fields.

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Got wood? This machine can make quick work of it, transforming it into mulch to use on a planting bed.

A chipper makes quick work of fallen or cut trees. Feeding the wood through the chipper produces mulch, which can then be spread over the soil to conserve moisture or keep weeds at bay.

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This machine can help you build a fence much more efficiently than a standard shovel. Think you can guess its name?

Drive past almost any farm and you'll see uninterrupted stretches of fences used to mark property lines and contain cattle, horses and livestock. A post-hole digger is a must-have for fence building and breaking through tough ground to create the holes required to accommodate support posts.

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If your farming dreams include producing your own Moscato or Merlot, you'll need this equipment to help you with your harvest.

Winemakers have long harvested grapes by hand, but the newest grape-harvesting equipment is able to collect the fruit from the vines without bruising or crushing the grapes. These machines use finger-like rods to break the grapes free, de-stem and sort them with ease. Some are designed for towing behind a tractor, while others have a cab and drive system built right in.

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Let's face it — hay is scratchy, messy and hard to handle. What is this machine that can ease your hay-handling woes?

Wrapping bales of hay in plastic helps to ferment the grain, creating a product called silage that can be fed to livestock. A bale wrapper makes it easy to get the wrapping done quickly. These machines can be designed to wrap a single bale or to wrap multiple bales in an in-line wrapping technique.

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If you're just getting started or don't have the capital for a combine, this old-school equipment can help you at harvest time. Think you can name it?

On large farms, combines are designed to both harvest and thresh grain all at once. Smaller farms may use a separate threshing machine, which removes the seeds from the stalk and husk of the grain after it has been cut.

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Clearing land for new farming fields? Can you ID this machine that can help you get the job done?

Sure, you can cut down trees with a chainsaw, but you're still left with stumps that can be truly challenging to deal with. A stump grinder is a piece of equipment that pulverizes these stumps to get them out of the way, clearing the land for planting or other needs.

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This old-school farming equipment towers over fields of crops and serves as a symbol of the agricultural industry. Remember what it's called?

Those tall towers you see casting shadows across a farm field are called silo. Ideal for storing grain, they are found on all farms in some form of another. While traditional cylinders are most common, you can also find bunker versions and even temporary plastic tube silos.

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Are you a fan of French fries or a latke lover? Then you should have no trouble identifying this common harvest equipment.

Potatoes grow underground, so harvesting them is no easy task. A potato harvester can be attached to a tractor and uses finger-like appendages to free the potatoes from their stems, lift them out of the dirt and collect them in a hopper — just in time to make some French fries.

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Worried about the lack of rain? With this piece of equipment, you can keep crops thriving regardless of what the weatherman says.

Farmers used to be at the complete mercy of the weather. Today, farmers have the option to make their own rain when the weather refuses to cooperate. Irrigation systems range from traditional sprinklers to drip irrigation, canals and tow-able wheel lines.

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While no one knows whether the chicken or the egg came first, today's farmers know that this equipment can help both thrive. Know what it's called?

Eggs require surprisingly specific temperature and humidity levels if they are to hatch properly and produce new chicks. An incubator ensures perfect conditions for hatching, resulting in greater poultry numbers. It takes about 21 days for a chicken egg to hatch in this equipment, while eggs from other birds can take a month or more.

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This equipment is responsible for harvesting the crops used to make your favorite jeans. What is its name?

Picking cotton is difficult, back-breaking work. Cotton pickers attach to a tractor, using a series of spindles and drums to pick and de-seed the cotton to get it ready for sale.

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Can you identify this versatile equipment used in both building and farming fields?

A front-end loader is a compact machine with a large bucket installed on the front. The machine makes quick work of moving everything from dirt to gravel or even snow. It's useful for digging, building or even clearing new fields for planting.

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Farmers growing delicate crops like strawberries rely on this specialty equipment to keep from squashing fruit during harvest.

Some crops are too difficult to harvest with a regular tractor. When you're growing things like delicate berries or valuable tobacco, a high-clearance tractor, which sits further off the ground than traditional models, can help you complete the harvest and tend to crops without doing any major damage.

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Sure, you can use this off the farm, but it's also useful for hauling and transport out in the fields. Think you know its name?

A pickup truck is a jack-of-all-trades on the farm. It can save time and energy if you need to travel to far-flung fields or outbuildings and is also helpful for hauling everything from tools to bags of feed to a crew of helpers ready to assist with the harvest.

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Back in the day, teams of horses would drag this device across the fields to loosen and aerate soil. Think you know its name?

A harrow is a metal-spiked implement designed to drag behind a tractor. It's used for tilling but doesn't work the ground as deeply as a plow. The harrow's role is to refine rough surfaces left after plowing, removing any weeds and covering seeds with a fine layer of dirt.

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