Can You Get a Perfect Score on This '70s Car Quiz in Under 7 Minutes?

By: Jacqueline Samaroo
Image: Matthew Lamb via Wiki Commons

About This Quiz

These cars were beasts on the road back in the day!

Were the '70s a great decade for automobiles? Truth be told, like any other decade, the '70s had their fair share of ups and downs that either directly or indirectly affected the automotive industry. For example, there were straightforward negatives like the 1973 oil crisis and the subsequent 1979 oil crisis. In addition to this, the Big Three (General Motors, Fiat Chrysler and Ford) seemed to be having one slip up and controversy after another when it came to their vehicles. However, on the bright side, consumers were getting more variety when it came to their automobile choices, due to the fact that imports like Toyota and Volkswagen had greatly increased their share of the United States market.

In this quiz we've taken a handful of some of the most memorable vehicles from the '70s, so that we can truly test your knowledge of one of the greatest decades! What can you expect from the decade that bridges the gap between classic cars and modern marvels? Put the pedal to the metal and let's find out!

This is the Ford Fairmont, a '70s compact car that was introduced in 1977. It was originally produced to be the successor to the Ford Maverick and it had a successful run from 1977 to 1983, when it was eventually replaced by the Ford Tempo.

This is the Dodge Challenger, a '70s muscle car that was introduced in 1970. For many people today, the 1970 Dodge Challenger is the prime example of a classic muscle car, in terms of both appearance and performance.

This is the Plymouth Duster, a '70s semi-fastback two-door coupe that was introduced in 1970. In the latter years of its run, the Duster was promoted, alongside other Plymouth cars, with an ad campaign that featured Judy Strangis as "Mean Mary Jean".

This is the Lotus Esprit, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1976. It is notable for having been designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro.

This is the Isuzu Gemini, a '70s subcompact car that was introduced in 1974. Subsequent generations of the Gemini after 1993 were actually just rebadged versions of the Honda Domani.

This is the Bricklin SV-1, a 70s two-seat sports car that was introduced in 1974. While the car itself had intriguing designs and features, it was ultimately doomed and short-lived, largely due to quality control problems and issues with the manufacturer.

This is the Fiat X1/9, a '70s mid-engined sports car that was introduced in 1972. The Fiat X1/9 had several notable features, including: retractable headlights, front and rear-storage compartments, and a lightweight-removable hardtop.

This is the Aston Martin Vantage, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1972. Only 71 units were produced during this time.

This is the Ferrari GT4, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1973. It is notable for being the first production Ferrari to feature a mid-engined V8 layout.

This is the Hyundai Pony, a '70s subcompact car that was introduced in 1975. It is notable for being South Korea's first mass-produced car.

This is the BMW 2002, a '70s compact executive car that was introduced in 1971. It was actually a member of the BMW 02 Series that had been introduced 5 years earlier

This is the Mitsubishi Lancer, a '70s compact car that was introduced in 1973. At present, there have been at least nine generations of the Lancer and over 6 million units have been sold.

This is the Buick Regal, a '70s mid-sized car that was introduced in 1973. In recent years, the Regal is simply a rebadged version of the Opel Insignia.

This is the Stutz Blackhawk, a '70s luxury car that was introduced in 1971. While it is named after the original Blackhawk from 1929, it shares no visual similarities with it.

This is the Porsche 930, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1975. During its first run, only 2,819 units were produced.

This is the Chrysler Centura, a '70s mid-sized car that was introduced in 1975. It is notable for being based on Chrysler Europe's Chrysler 180 model.

This is the Porsche 928, a '70s luxury grand tourer that was introduced in 1977. It was actually originally introduced as a replacement for the 911 but eventually proved to be less popular.

This is the Ford Pinto, a '70s subcompact car that was introduced in 1971. It is notable for being the first mass-produced American car that was sold with rack and pinion steering.

This is the Maserati Merak, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1982. During its 11-year run, there were only 1,830 units made.

This is the Ferrari 400, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1976. It was unveiled at the 1976 Paris Motor Show as the intended replacement for the Ferrari 365 GT4.

This is the second generation Chevrolet Camaro, a '70s pony car that was introduced in 1970. It was designed and produced as a direct competitor to the Ford Mustang.

This is the Lancia Stratos, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1973. After its five-year run, only 492 units were produced.

This is the Maserati Kyalami, a '70s four-seat GT coupé that was introduced in 1976. It was named after the Kyalami Grand Prix Circuit in South Africa.

This is the AMC Gremlin, a '70s subcompact car that was introduced in 1970. In just one generation, there were over 670,000 units sold.

This is the Cadillac Fleetwood, a '70s luxury car that was introduced in 1976. As the name suggests, it was manufactured by the Cadillac division of General Motors.

This is the Mazda RX-7, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1978. All 800,000 units that were produced over three generations used a compact Wankel engine.

This is the Fiat 131, a '70s sedan that was introduced in 1974. The Fiat 131 was extremely successful, with over 1.5 million units produced in its 10-year run.

This is the Oldsmobile Omega, a '70s compact that was introduced in 1973. All three of the Omega’s generations were actually badge-engineered Chevrolet models.

This is the BMW 3.0 CSL, a '70s grand tourer that was introduced in 1971. It was designed and produced as a direct preplacement for the BMW 2800CS.

This is the Chevrolet Corvette (C3), a sports car that was produced in the 1970s and well into the 1980s. It is notable for having a new body and interior while making use of chassis and engines from previous generations.

This is the Mercury Capri, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1970. It is notable for actually being produced in West Germany by Ford of Europe.

This is the Honda Accord, a '70s compact car that was introduced in 1976. While the original was fairly successful, later generations in the late '80s and '90s actually contended for the title of best-selling car in the US.

This is the Triumph Stag, a '70s sports tourer that was introduced in 1970. It is notable for being designed by the Italian designer Giovanni Michelotti.

This is the Lamborghini Countach, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1974. It is one of the most iconic Italian wedge cars, and approximately 2,000 were produced over 26 years.

This is the Honda Civic, a '70s subcompact that was introduced in 1972. While today it is a four-door car, it was originally introduced as a two-door model and a three-door hatchback.

This is the Toyota Celica, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1971. The name is derived from the Latin word “coeliac”, which means celestial or heavenly.

This is the Ford Mustang II, a '70s pony car that was introduced in 1973. It is often recognized as one of the most iconic pony cars of the era.

This is the Alfa Romeo Montreal, a '70s sports car that was introduced in 1970. Although it was introduced in the '70s, it actually debuted as a concept in 1967 at Expo 67.

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