Can You Finish These Sunday School Songs?

J. Reinoehl

Image: Shutterstock

About This Quiz

Did you sing the loudest in Sunday School? Do you remember the songs you sang? Take this quiz to find out how many of these classic Sunday School songs you remember.

There are so many classic Sunday School songs that we could not fit them all into this quiz, but we did try to pick out some of what we remember to be the best ones. Some of these tunes are so well known, that they are easily recognizable outside of Sunday School and by people who never even learned them on Sunday morning. 

Who could forget classics such as, "Jesus Loves Me," "Down in My Heart," "Deep and Wide," "Old Time Religion," "God Made Me," "This Little Light of Mine," "Jesus Loves the Little Children," and "Give Me Oil in My Lamp"? If you remember all of these, can you tell us from which of these songs these lyrics came?

"Jesus loves the little children

All the children of the world

Red and yellow, black and white

They are precious in His sight

Jesus loves the little children of the world."

If you said that these lyrics are from the Sunday School Song "Jesus Loves the Little Children," you're right, and you're ready to take this quiz.

Let's get started.


“Jesus loves me this I know, for ______________

"Jesus loves me this I know for the Bible tells me so. Little ones to him belong, they are weak but He is strong.”

“I am a C. I am a ______________

Sunday School first began in 1780 in Gloucester, England. Robert Raikes is credited with its creation.

“Some bright morning when this life is over ______________

“Some bright morning when this life is over, I’ll fly away. To that home on God’s celestial shore, I’ll fly away. I’ll fly away. Oh glory, I’ll fly away. When I die Hallelujah by and by, I’ll fly away.”

“Deep and wide, deep and wide, there’s a ___________

Sunday School moved to the United States shortly after it was founded. Many of the songs that were used in England were believed to be too rough for American children.

“Give me oil in my lamp. Keep me _____________

"Give me oil in my lamp, keep me burning, burning, burning. Give me oil in my lamp, I pray. Give me oil in my lamp, keep me burning, burning, burning. Keep me burning till the break of day.”

“This little light of mine, I’m gonna ____________________

Early English Sunday Schools used songs from "Divine and Moral Songs for Children." The book was written in 1715 by Isaac Watts.

“Do Lord, oh, do Lord, oh, do __________________

“Do Lord, oh, do Lord, oh, do remember me. Do Lord, oh, do Lord, oh, do remember me. Do Lord, oh, do Lord, oh, do remember me. Look away beyond the blue.”

"He’s got the whole world ____________________

It wasn’t until the 1860s that American Sunday School songs as we know them were compiled in collections. These soon became popular.

“I may never march in the infantry, ___________________

"I may never march in the infantry, ride in the cavalry, shoot the artillery. I may never fly o’er the enemy, but I’m in the Lord’s army. Yes, sir!”

"Zaccheus was a wee little man, and a wee little man was he. He climbed up ________________ for the Lord he wanted to see."

William Bradbury compiled Golden Chain in 1861. The best known children’s hymn, Jesus Loves Me, is attributed to Bradbury.

“Go, tell it on the mountain ______________

“Go, tell it on the mountain over the hills and everywhere. Go, tell it on the mountain that Jesus Christ is born. While shepherds kept their watching over silent flocks by night, behold throughout the heavens there shone a holy light.”

“Jesus loves the little children, __________________

The music of Sunday School songs often appealed to children and adults. Most of the songs are bright, rhythmically simple, and catchy.

"Rejoice in the ____________________

“Rejoice in the Lord always, and again I say rejoice.”

“I’ve got peace like ______________

The lyrics of Sunday School songs tend to focus on three aspects: the joys of Heaven, how satisfying the Christian life is, and how much Jesus Christ loves the singer.

"The B-I-B-L-E, yes that’s the book for me. I _______________

“The B-I-B-L-E, yes that’s the book for me. I stand alone on the Word of God—the B-I-B-L-E.”

"Someone’s praying, my Lord, _________________

Kum-Ba-Yah was collected from the Gullah (or Geechee) people of South Carolina and Georgia. Samuel G. Freedman recorded a Georgia man singing the song in 1926 on a wax-cylinder device.

"The Lord is mine, and I am His. _______________

“The Lord is mine, and I am His. His banner over me is love.”

“Praise Him. Praise Him. Praise Him _________________

Camp meeting songs inspired William Bradbury’s Sunday School songs. His songs, in turn, inspired later musicians to write gospel hymns.

“Father Abraham had many sons. Many sons had Father Abraham. I am one of them, _____________

“Father Abraham had many sons. Many sons had Father Abraham. I am one of them, and so are you. So let's all praise the Lord. Right arm!”

“The wise man built his _______________

Another inspiration for William Bradbury was the parlor song, which was sold as sheet music. He liked the chorus or refrain, which was a feature of the modern music of the era.

“I looked over Jordan, and what did I see coming for ________________

“I looked over Jordan, and what did I see, coming for to carry me home? A band of angels coming after me, coming for to carry me home. Swing low, sweet chariot, coming for to carry me home.”

"The Lord told Noah to build him ________________

Dwight Moody soon adopted some of the Sunday School songs for his popular campaigns in the 1870s. He began attending Sunday School at the age of 17, and after becoming a Christian, he founded his own Sunday School program in Chicago in 1858.

“Rock-a my soul in __________

“Rock-a my soul in the bosom of Abraham. Rock-a my soul in the bosom of Abraham. Rock-a my soul in the bosom of Abraham. Oh, rock-a my soul. So high you can’t get over it. So low, you can’t get under it. So wide, you can’t get ‘round it. You gotta go in at the door.”

"It’s me; (it’s me;) it’s me, oh Lord______________

The Methodist Episcopal Church had developed a collection of American Sunday School Songs by 1854 titled "Hymns for Sunday-Schools, Youth and Children." Most of these are in the modern Methodist hymnal.

“Joshua fought the battle of Jericho, Jericho, Jericho. Joshua fought the battle of Jericho and _____________

"Joshua fought the battle of Jericho, Jericho, Jericho. Joshua fought the battle of Jericho and the walls came a-tumbling down. You may talk about your men of Gideon. You may talk about your men of Saul, but there’s none like good old Joshua at the battle of Jericho.”

"I’ve got the joy, joy, joy, joy, down in my ____________

Since Sunday Schools were initially established to teach working children how to read, child labor laws changed the setup. Since children could no longer work six days a week, they were able to learn reading in a regular school.

“____________ cried them dry bones.”

“Ezekiel cried them dry bones. Ezekiel cried them dry bones. Ezekiel cried them dry bones. So hear the Word of the Lord. The foot bone connected to the leg bone. The leg bone connected to the knee bone.”

"Who did, who did, who did, who did, who did ______________

The first known American Children’s Hymnal was Hervey Wilbur’s "A Sunday School Hymn Book for Youth" (1818). This “hymn book” did not contain music—just lyrical poems.

"Who built the ark? __________________

"Who built the ark? Noah, Noah. Who built the ark? Brother Noah built the ark. Old man Noah built the ark. He built it out of hickory bark.”

"This is my commandment that you love one another __________________

The first American Sunday School Song compilation with music was "The Sunday School Music Book." E. Osborn wrote it in 1826. These early attempts at hymnals still contained adult-oriented lyrics despite their names.

"I’m in-right, outright, upright, downright ____________

“I’m in-right, outright, upright, downright, happy all the time. I’m in-right, outright, upright, downright, happy all the time. Since Jesus Christ came in and took away my sin, I’m in-right, outright, upright, downright, happy all the time.”

“I will make you fishers of men, fishers of men, fishers of men, ___________

The camp movement was a series of revivals (many centered around The Chautauqua Lake in New York), where adults would go in the summer and camp to learn more about the Bible. From these, Lewis Miller and John Heyl Vincent developed a Sunday School teaching course in 1874 to teach adults how to teach Sunday School.

"Children go where I send thee. How shall I send thee? ________________

“Children go where I send thee. How shall I send thee? I’m gonna send thee one-by-one. One for the little bitty baby born, born, born in Bethlehem.”

"Oh, be careful little eyes what you see. Oh, be careful little eyes what you see ____________

Most Sunday School hymnals were developed in the North, but this changed when the Civil War began. The blockade made it difficult for Southern churches to obtain new hymnals, and around 1863, they began producing their own versions in earnest.

"Wade in the water. Wade in the water, children. Wade in the water. ___________

“Wade in the water. Wade in the water, children. Wade in the water. God’s gonna trouble the water. Who’s that girl dressed in red? Wade in the water. Must be the children that Moses led. God’s gonna trouble the water.”

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